Archives

Social history

Cocoa Works Brass Band

Formed in 1903, the Rowntree’s Brass Band was an important part of factory identity. The 16th edition of the Cocoa Works Magazine (June 1903) has an entry marking the formation of the band. It has been suggested that the formation of a Brass Band in connection with the Works would be welcomed by more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree’s 1904 Memorandum

A first draft of a Memorandum on the proposed Trust, marked ‘Exceedingly Private’, took the form of a paper to Joseph Rowntree’s advisers. Some of his intentions were expressed as questions; examples of possible initiatives were given; relations with the Rowntree Company were left uncertain since the form and amount of the property more »< Read More...

John Bright

John Bright (1811-1889), born in Rochdale, Lancashire was a liberal statesmen and a strong critic of British Foreign Policy. He spent two years at Bootham School, where the library is named after him. A great orator, together with Richard Cobden, he was a key advocate in the campaign to have the Corn Laws repealed. more »< Read More...

George Fox

George Fox (1624-1691) was a founder of the Religious Society of Friends. He rebelled against the prescriptive religious and political authorities and went to London in 1643 in a state of mental confusion, from which he found solace in the Bible. Over the next few years ox travelled around the country engaging clergy more »< Read More...

John Woolman

John Woolman (1720-1772) was a North American itinerant Quaker preacher and early abolitionist. He came to England in 1772 to garner Quaker support for the abolition of slavery. He is buried in the Quaker Burial Ground on Cromwell Road. External Links http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wool Read More...

Friends Provident Institution

Founded in 1832 in Bradford by Joseph Rowntree and Samuel Tuke as the Friends Provident Institution, a friendly society for members of the Religious Society of Friends, it continues to this day with the name Friends Life. In 1845 it became a mutual life assurance company. Today there is no formal link between more »< Read More...

Samuel Tuke

Samuel Tuke (1784-1857), born in York, was the grandson of Henry Tuke, and son of William Tuke, who together both founded The Retreat in York in 1796. Samuel Tuke continued the work of his grandfather and father, helping to publicise the term ‘moral treatment’, and the work being carried out at The Retreat, in more »< Read More...

Conscientious objectors, York and

A good source of information about this subject is found in the archives at Bootham School. World War I Before WW1 between half and three-quarters of the pupils were connected with the Society of Friends in some way.  The number of boys attending the school did not reach 100 until 1918. Contrary to more »< Read More...

Winston Churchill on Seebohm Rowntree’s work

On reading Seebohm Rowntree’s book on Poverty in York, Winston Churchill (then a Liberal MP and social reformer of David Lloyd George’s government) said to an audience in Blackpool in 1902: ‘I have been reading a book which has fairly made my hair stand on end, written by a Mr Rowntree, who deals more »< Read More...

USA, Rowntrees and

The attention to foreign developments demonstrated by family members of the Rowntree clan is seen in the social studies conducted by Joseph and Seebohm Rowntree. For his study The Temperance Problem and Social Reform, conducted with Arthur Shewell and first published in 1899, Joseph surveyed the alcohol policies in different countries, including the more »< Read More...